Bitmoji and Piktochart

This week I played with Bitmoji and Piktochart. I started out with Bitmoji, and was pretty disappointed. Bitmoji was ok, but I don’t really see any applications in the classroom. It seemed like more of a time waster than anything. I did enjoy being able to make my own avatar, but I wish that there was more I could do with it than just putting my avatar into cookie cutter stickers to send to people. That is a lot of work for something that someone will glance at and then continue on with their day. I would have liked a way to actually customize the images that it makes, such as changing the words and such. I was also disappointed because in the blog that Bitmoji was linked to, it said Bitstrips. I dug a little deeper and I couldn’t find Bitstrips, which is what I really wanted to play with. I never tried Bitstrips, but I was always under the impression that it is more of what I wanted out of Bitmoji. I gave Bitmoji a chance, but I’m not all that impressed with it.

Since I didn’t really enjoy Bitmoji, I decided to play around more with some of the other things. I loved Piktochart, and can actually see myself using it in the future. I prefer to go to use Photoshop or Illustrator to make my posters, but it is nice to have a website with pre-made presentations to work with. I’ve been using Publisher when I can’t get into the graphic design lab to make presentations or posters, but Piktochart runs smoother and it is a lot more user friendly than other programs I’ve used. I can see it being effective for something that needs to be done quickly, such as using it for shorter research projects. A teacher could easily have students do a quick research project and have them organize their findings into a poster or presentation using this program. 

All in all, I’m  not blown out of the water by what we learned about this week. While there are some good tools in here like Piktochart, I prefer to use programs like Photoshop to do things like make presentations and posters. As far as Bitmoji goes, I don’t see it ever being relevant in a classroom and I know I won’t ever have any use for it.

Bitmoji creation:

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Piktochart:

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12 thoughts on “Bitmoji and Piktochart

  1. Same — I was totally bummed that Bitstrips had been discontinued — I never got to try it out when it was in its heyday two or three years ago (if memory serves). Bitmoji’s fun (I love the custom character options; I love customization in any form), but it’s more for brief expressions than solid content creation. Nice job on the poster, by the way!

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  2. Bitmoji is very much a time waster but it is kind of fun to play around with. I would never use it in the classroom but it fun when you are texting friends and such. The piktochart does seem like a very cool resource though. Thank you for sharing!

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  3. I actually use bitmoji quite a bit with my PLN. When you are replying to people, it is fun to use a cartoon. I think they could apply to digital assignments like a ‘good job’ sticker too.

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    1. Again, it just seems like a bit of a time suck for something that won’t be appreciated all that much. Yes, it’s fun, but I don’t see the point in spending five minutes to find something to use to reply to someone.

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    1. I personally like Photoshop so much just because I have total control over the entire layout. It’s also just a really good tool to know how to use because of how flexible it is. Piktochart has just enough customization for me to like it and it’s really easy to use.

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  4. Its hard to apply bimoji into the classroom while still making it something that the kids can get out of other than just for entertainment. The Piktochart seems to be one of the favorites by many of our classmates and I am bummed I didn’t check it out, I might have to give it a try later this week.

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